Welcome to Boss Reviews!

Home tools Buyer's Guides from tech enthusiast who loves technology and clever solutions for better living.

Check Today Price

Best bike mirror 2018 – [Buyer’s Guide]

Last Updated December 1, 2018
Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Pin on Pinterest0Share on StumbleUpon0Tweet about this on Twitter

Willard LawsonMy name is Willard Lawson. After spending over 32 hours comparing at least 11 bike mirror, I am recommending the best bike mirror of 2018

Eventually, I found something that would suit my needs but it occurred to me that I wasn’t the only one who might be having the same problems I did. Without further-a-do, let’s take a look at the Top 3 list in 2018 which are available in the market.

Best bike mirror of 2018

Come with me. Before you spend your money on bike mirror, start by familiarizing yourself with the various types. So this is not only going to give you an insight to the best bike mirror of the 2018 but also those which are user friendly and easy to work with. Not all bike mirror are created equal though.

Test Results and Ratings

Rank №1 №2 №3
Product
Total 4.8 4.5 4.3
Design
5 points
4 points
4 points
Materials
5 points
4 points
4 points
Performance
4 points
5 points
4 points
Price
5 points
5 points
5 points
Awards 1
button button button
banner banner banner

 

 

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the bike mirror by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

№1 – EEEKit 2 Packs Bundle Universal Mini Rotaty Rearview Handlebar Glass Mirror for Mountain Road Bike Cycling Bicycle

 
EEEKit 2 Packs Bundle Universal Mini Rotaty Rearview Handlebar Glass Mirror for Mountain Road Bike Cycling Bicycle

Pros
360 rotation, compact, stylish appearance bike mirror, better adjust to any direction
Universal mini rotaty rearview handlebar hlass mirror for bike bicycle cycling
360 degree rotate help you watch every direction of you back. Sometimes treat it as a mirror to check your face or cloth.
Cons
I didn’t notice a single drawback yet
 
Total:
4.8

Why did this bike mirror win the first place?

I am very happy with the purchase. It is definitely worth its money. The product is top-notch! The product is very strong. Its material is stable and doesn’t crack. I really enjoy the design. It is compact, comfortable and reliable. And it looks amazing! I also liked the delivery service that was fast and quick to react. It was delivered on the third day.

banner2


Design
5

5star

Materials
5

5star

Performance
4

4star

Price
5

5star

 

 

№2 – A Pair of Rearview Bicycle Mirrors

 
A Pair of Rearview Bicycle Mirrors

Pros
Flexible: Brackets and mirrors can be rotated 360 degree depending on your needs.Adjust to different bikes: It is more suitable for Kids Bike and fixed gear bikes than for other bikes.Easy installation: Suitable for handlebar with 1.7 cm to 2 cm ( 0.67 to 0.79 inches ) diameter, you can easily tighten it to the handlebars with tools.Wide viewing angle: Wide view convex mirror provides a wider view.Convenient to use: 360 degree Rotational lens can be used on left or right sides, you need not to distinguish the sides when installing.
Cons
A little on the heavy side.
It lacks advanced features.
 
Total:
4.5

Why did this bike mirror come in second place?

Seems that the material is good. It has a very beautiful color but I don’t really like the texture. The design quality is top notch and the color is nice. I like this product. For such a low price, I didn’t even hope it to be any better. It’s decently made. I really liked it. It is amazing in every aspect. It did even exceed my expectations for a bit, considering the affordable price.

banner2


Design
4

4star

Materials
4

4star

Performance
5

5star

Price
5

5star

 

 

№3 – Mirrycle MTB Bar End Mountain Bicycle Mirror

 
Mirrycle MTB Bar End Mountain Bicycle Mirror

Pros
Three-inch round, handlebar mounted rearview mirror for bicycles
Wide view convex mirror pivots to any viewing angle
Mounts onto bar end of handle bar
Cons
Extremely expensive.
Soft parts prone to damage.
 
Total:
4.3

Why did this bike mirror take third place?

I liked the design. We’ve been using it for 2 months and it still looks like brand new. It doesn’t squeaks nor bents. Looks great in my apartment. It is inconvenient to use due to the size. I am going to get something different next time. A very convenient model. It is affordable and made of high-quality materials.

banner2


Design
4

4star

Materials
4

4star

Performance
4

4star

Price
5

5star

 

 

bike mirror Buyer’s Guide

If you keep the before points in mind, you can easily go out to the market and buy bike mirror, right? No!

Tips on How to Bike to Work

Riding a bike to work can do so many wonderful things for your health, the environment and even for your mood. I guess there is a reason why the happiest countries in the world are also the ones where cycling is prevalent.

As it gains in popularity, they too might be interested in switching to commuting by bicycle. So in this section, you’ll find plenty of beneficial information and biking to work tips, as well as some bicycle to work myth busting, ahead in this section.

Know Your Route

Map the distance to your destination and time the ride using your average speed.

You might have to adjust your alarm clock to be in places on time, but you could also save a lot of time by finding routes through remote streets designated bike lanes or off-road trails.

Google Maps have been updating their directions for cyclists it’s just depends on your location. So, find the right App ahead of the journey.

Don’t put yourself and others in danger, so be sure to research the law in your country and state first.

In some states, it’s against the law to ride a bike on certain streets, and you must wear a helmet.

You also should know hand signals and what’s considered safe and what’s dangerous.

All this you should be able to research online – just Google for cycling rules in your location.

Nevertheless, the safest solution might be to stop by at your local police department, and they will gladly answer all your questions about commuting to work with bicycle.

Take A Look

The first thing you notice about these sunglasses is the size. The lens is large, coming up taller than most of the opposition. The effect of this is that it offers masses of coverage when you’re down in the drops — there’s virtually no intrusion from the frame into your view in even the most extreme position on the bike.

The flipside is that this can interfere with the brow of your helmet, and at the very least means there’s less airflow over the top of the frame. As a result, they did fog up from the top a little, although the mid-length vents at the top of the lens helped them to clear quickly enough.

The frame has a nifty bar in the centre of the glasses, which when pressed helps to release the lens if you want to swap it. The glasses don’t come with spare lenses, but the stock ‘Road’ lens has a level tint, which is neither too dark nor too light and it works well in a wide range of light conditions.

The lens is made by Carl Zeiss, and is curved on both the vertical and horizontal axes, making the optics among the best we’ve found.

The slim arms have a moderate amount of flex. Combined with their low weight, the Do Blades are comfortable over long periods of time. There’s minimal pressure on your ears anyway, although if there was a little more flexibility in the nose-piece, fit would be marginally improved.

Your Bicycle Mirror Should Be Safe To Use

Something I failed to talk about in my first review of the various types of bicycle mirrors is safety.

One of the reasons some cyclists refuse to wear a mirror is because they fear that if they are ever in an accident the mirror or the arm the mirror is extended on will be pushed into their eye or head, possibly causing serious damage.

CycleAware mirrors, unlike many of the other bicycle mirrors on the market, are designed with safety in mind.

First of all, CycleAware mirrors have no sharp edges and no exposed wires. If you do get yourself into an accident, there is almost no chance of you cutting on poking yourself to death.

The Weight Of Your Mirror Is Important

One of the big complaints many riders at Interbike had about riding with a bicycle mirror is that the mirrors they had used in the past were simply too heavy for their liking. Weight is important when selecting a mirror for your bicycle tour… and you want to keep that weight down as much as possible.

Our 36Day ‘No Worries’ Return Policy

Shop with complete confidence with CELL with our 36day returns policy.

Prescriptions

If you need to wear glasses or contacts, then there are a few additional things to think about.

For contact lens wearers, wide lenses and a wraparound style will help keep grit out of the eye and away from the lens. The advantage of contacts is that you can swap your sunglasses if the conditions change and still be able to see.

If you prefer to wear glasses rather than contacts, then many opticians can make up inserts to the right level which sit inside your sunglasses. Some of these are specific to the brand of sunglasses you have so make sure you get the right ones.  Anti-fog coating is a good idea too; there’s no point in having amazing sunnies if your inserts get fogged up every time you stop.

Alternatively, you can have the sunglasses lens itself made up to a prescription. Lots of companies offer this, such as Oakley and Bolle.

When it comes to fit, there is really no substitute for trying them on. You want the glasses to sit closely against your face, resting on your nose, cheeks and forehead. The arms should grip the sides of your head firmly, but not too tightly.

Make sure your peripheral vision is not obscured by the frame; this is where the wraparound fit comes in. Watch out for things like catching your eyelashes on the lens when you blink – after a couple of hours, this can become annoying beyond belief.

A secure fit is important, particularly if you’re going to be riding bumpy trails. When you have the glasses on try shaking, bobbing and moving your head around a little to check. It may look a bit silly, but not half as silly as your new specs flying off your face halfway round a bend.

There are so many sport-specific glasses out there in a huge range of styles and colours, and at a lot of price points, so you shouldn’t have to settle for a pair you don’t like the look of.

If you’ve found a pair of glasses that have all the features you need, and you like what you see in the mirror, you’re on to a winner.

Refurbished Exercise Bikes

One alternative to buying a brand new exercise bike, is to look at refurbished or ex-demo models. Even for home users looking for a good quality bike, a refurbished indoor cycle or exercise bike can be much more cost effective and are often better quality pieces of equipment.

If you do decide to buy a refurbished or ex-demo model, it’s important to ask what work has actually been done to the bike during the refurbishment. When Origin Fitness refurbish a spin bike, we take all of the components off the bike and make sure all the parts are in working order. If we find any parts that are damaged we replace them. When required, we also sand blast all metal parts to remove as much of the cosmetic wear and tear as possible.

Garmin Edge 520

What they say: The Garmin Edge 520 is packed full of the latest features including in-ride challenges through Strava Live segments.

The 520 also features a full colour display, connected capabilities and a whole array advanced analysis features. The Edge 520 brings recreational cycling into the futire.

What we say: Having long dominated the cycling computer world, Garmin could be forgiven for letting the blade dull. So what is the new Garmin like? Well, the 520 is lighter than its predecessor the Garmin 510.

Despite boasting a larger screen it still manages to shave off a fair bit of heft (it tips the scales at 60g compared to the 510’s 80g). Unlike the 5though, its operated via (seven) buttons, rather than touch-screen navigation, resulting in greater ease of use.

OK, so what’s inside it? We’ll start with the Strava Live segments feature. This allows the 520 to tap into everyone’s favourite cycling app so you can see how close you are to beating your preferred routes as you ride them.

Support for third-party maps has also been added, allowing you to use free online services such as OpenStreet Maps which enhances navigation options.

There’s also a host of customisable fields for data (more than we can list here) including the new Functional Threshold Power and wa s/kg tracking.

The only drawback is the 510’s not easy to adjust on the fly. But it more than makes up for this with its superb customising capabilities which, when used to their full potential, are a real aid in training.

Lezyne Micro C GPS

What they say: At a feathery 2grams, and with a battery that can last up to 1hours, this is the ultimate GPS computer for riders that want all the features in a compact design.

What we say: The dinkiest device on offer, the Micro C GPS is half the size of the Wahoo and Garmin, with a 1.in screen. Lezyne also uses a free companion app (Lezyne Ally) which you can easily pop a destination into and sync to your device.

Like the Wahoo, though, this means having to access your phone if you change your mind about where you’re headed. Because the device is so compact the screen size is necessarily tiny.

This means that – if like us you’ve got rubbish eyesight – you may struggle to use the map function. Thankfully navigation is also handled by turn-by-turn direction cues which are much easier to see.

The app also notifies the device of any incoming messages, as well as how much battery life is in both the device (fully charged it’s a claimed 1hours, incidentally) and your phone.

The price is what makes this one particularly attractive, though, offering many of the same features that you’d find on the Garmin or Wahoo but for significantly less moolah.

As well as the navigation system, for example, you can also pair the device to Bluetooth or ANT+ enabled power meters, heart-rate monitors and speed/cadence sensors, while the satellite data you receive even includes an integrated barometer and accelerometer.

The HubBub weighs only 1grams, so you won’t feel it on your lid. And it’s made of tough bent steel wire That’s vinyl-coated where it grips the helmet to stay securely in place. You simply press it onto the helmet. You can bend the clamping parts for a tighter fit if needed. It also works with visors and without, too.

It’s a strong wire frame, so, once it’s shaped to your helmet and required position, it won’t change, unlike more fragile mirrors that need adjusting every time you lay down your helmet and knock them out of position.

A great rear view from all riding positions

Once it’s adjusted, the HubBub gives you a full view behind whether you’re riding the tops, hoods or drops, and even if you’re standing to climb. Smaller mirrors can require dropping a shoulder or turning your head to move the mirror into position for the right view, but the HubBub is large enough so that I don’t need to do that.

A headlight for darker or faster commutes

Some cyclists prefer silicone-strap mounts, which can be simpler to attach to, and remove from, the seatpost. If that’s important to you, the Knog Blinder Mob V Kid Grid is a great choice. This thin, ruby-red taillight projects up to 4lumens—more than sufficient for most city riders—at a 45-degree angle that extends down the road while casting a wide beam around the rear wheel. However, this light is more expensive on a per-lumen basis than our top taillight pick and has a shorter battery life. Also, the small mounting latch can be tough to manipulate with gloved hands.

Cygolite Streak 450 and Hotshot 50 SL

For less than the usual price of our top headlight pick, you can knock out both your front and rear light needs with the Cygolite Streak 450 and Hotshot 50 SL set. While this pairing of a 450-lumen headlight and a 50-lumen taillight doesn’t offer the battery life or illumination of our top picks in either category, it accomplishes enough for the rider who sticks to streetlamp-lit streets or has a short commute. The batteries are advertised to run 100 and 200 hours, respectively, but those numbers apply only if you run the lights on their absolute lowest power modes, which aren’t adequate to light your way or signal your location to cars—we recommend sticking with the higher settings.

Pull Quote

In addition to using lights, ride in protected bike lanes when they’re available to you, and ride defensively when they’re not.

No matter what kind of light you’re shopping for, stressed Barb Chamberlain, you should be aware of what they can’t accomplish—namely, they can’t guarantee your safety.

So in addition to using lights, ride in protected bike lanes when they’re available to you, and ride defensively when they’re not. The experts I spoke with also suggested wearing fluorescent gear during the day and reflective gear at night.

Charge time

When you wake up and realize you A) forgot to charge your light and B) it’s nearly time to leave for work, you need a light that can juice up quickly enough to get you on your bike instead of the bus. Headlights tend to need between two and six hours to charge fully; I eliminated those that required five or more hours to reach a full charge. Rear lights usually take anywhere from 90 minutes to five hours to charge; most people charge their rear lights less often than they do their headlights, so I didn’t think that a long charging time was as much of a dealbreaker for that category.

Brightness

For the purposes of this guide, “visibility” refers to how well a driver can see a cyclist, and “acuity” refers to how well a cyclist can see the road. Good visibility, from your bike’s headlights and taillights, gives a driver enough time to safely react to a cyclist in the road at speed; good acuity, from your bike’s headlights, ensures you’ll see that patch of ice in the road in time.

In addition to the beam distance and flash pattern, a light’s overall brightness—how much light it can produce—is an important element of visibility and acuity. A good light needs to be strong enough to illuminate the road both day and night, but not so much that it blinds oncoming traffic. The brightness of a headlight is typically advertised in lumens, a measure of how powerful the light from a given source appears to human eyes.

Side lighting

One mistake many cyclists make when equipping themselves with “be seen” lighting is neglecting side visibility, experts told us. To boost rider visibility from all directions, some manufacturers have been adding cutout side windows, amber side lighting, or lenses that wrap around the sides of the light. The majority of the lights I chose to test offered one or both of these features.

Number of modes

Plenty of companies advertise their mode-packed lights as a way for you to set your beams how you want them—but they fail to include enough information to help you make that decision, especially for rear lights. If your light has 1different flashing modes, for instance, the difficulty of finding the exact mode you need at any given moment may well outweigh the relief of having just that right mode. And you’ll be hard-pressed to find a cyclist who feels like they could make an educated choice between a pattern with three-second intervals at 50 lumens, and a pattern with two-second intervals at 40 lumens. Also, if you need to switch quickly between modes—say, you see oncoming traffic and need to adjust your lights so you don’t blind anyone—you definitely don’t want to take a long time to find the right mode.

With this in mind, I eliminated lights with more than seven modes if they required you to run through all of them in one cycle, as well as lights with more than modes if they had two separate mode menus.

Bicycling Magazine. 

Effective Cycling shows a rider (Forester) with a large off center reflector. Reflectorized clothing and a “Flash Flag” (see above) are also good attention getters.  dark, you need an expensive, multi-beam, high-power system.  For commuting on smooth, “see” over a handlebar bag, you can rig another mounting system.  A small flashlight is handy for repairs in the dark and can serve as a backup headlight.

 

 

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the bike mirror by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

Final Word

First of all thanks for reading my article to the end! I hope you find my reviews listed here useful and that it allows you to make a proper comparison of what is best to fit your needs and budget. Don’t be afraid to try more than one product if your first pick doesn’t do the trick.

Most important, have fun and choose your bike mirror wisely! Good luck!

So, TOP3 of bike mirror

 

 

Questions? Leave a comment below!

Chatting about bike mirror is my passion! Leave me a question in the comments, I answer each and every one and would love to get to know you better!



Leave a comment!

Let us know what you have to say:

RECENTLY REVIEWED
Best gun cleaning kits of 2018
Best guitar volume pedal of 2018
Best ferret food of 2018
Best locking mailbox of 2018
Best wool dryer balls of 2018


AFFILIATE DISCLOSURE

Some posts may contain affiliate links. boss-reviews.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.
FOLLOW US

       
 
COPYRIGHT © 2017 · boss-reviews.com · ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
DMCA.com Protection Status